Selfdestructible by Mike Vago

Every young person thinks they’re indestructible. Ree knows it. Her parents were superheroes. They passed on invulnerability and the power of flight to their daughter, but when she was 14, they were both killed trying to save New York. Now it’s ten years later. Ree’s unemployed, drinks too much, and tries to blot out the feeling that she should be doing more with her life. Flying around punching people can only do so much to help Buffalo’s entrenched poverty and segregation. But when she flies into a burning building and sees a person made of fire, and rescues a teenage girl who can blow things up in her sleep, she’s drawn into a mystery against her better judgement.

Charles is a typical teenage boy. He just wants a girl to notice him. And for everyone else to not notice him. Which is tough to manage when flames shoot out of his hands and almost burn down his school. Usually powers like his aren’t a surprise; you inherit them from your parents. But Charles’ parents are just regular people. So why isn’t he? When he meets a cute older girl who can freeze anything she touches, will opposites attract? And will she help him solve the mystery of his powers?

Mike Vago is a regular contributor to The A.V. Club, and has published four novelty-format books, including The Miniature Book of Miniature Golf. Selfdestructible is his first novel. He tells people he lives in New York City, but he really lives in New Jersey.

Author web site: https://www.workman.com/authors/mike-vago

The book can be ordered in paperback from your local bookstore, and is available in paperback and ebook from Amazon.

Selfdestructible is a fast-paced adventure that mines extraordinary abilities to tell a grounded story about damaged people finding their place in the world.” — Caitlin PenzeyMoog, The A.V. Club

“The combo of young adult/superhero is neither brand new nor has it been exhausted, and Mike Vago makes a worthy and personal contribution to it with his debut novel Selfdestructible… the feel of it calls up one of the best and most underrated of superhero movies, the first X-Men: a melancholic character study, occasionally interrupted by the burdens of history and spectacle, about people who are different from everyone else in the world, and not by choice.” — Grant “Wallflower” Nebel, The Solute

2 thoughts on “Selfdestructible by Mike Vago

  1. Interested to see how Ree and Charles’ stories combine, but this sounds like an interesting mix of, like, The Boys and Hancock and perhaps a bit of One-Punch Man. I like the sound of it.

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